Uruguay I Division

First Division. 14 teams, one relegated and simple league formula without final stage or any other complications.
Huracan Buceo finished last with 10 points and was relegated. Standing from left: Jorge González, Blas A. Romero, Gerald Britos, Heber Pais, ?, Da Silva. First row: Julio Zoppi, Gustavo Badell, Oscar Quagliatta, ?, Washington Silva.
River Plate – 13th with 19 points.
Cerro – 12th with 21 points.
Progreso – 11th with 22 points. The 1989 champions were now down the table… not unexpected, really. Perhaps playing on two fronts – domestic and Copa Libertadores – was too much for a modest team without stars.
Wanderers – 10th with 23 points.
Rentistas – 9th with 24 points. They were the team with most draws in the championship – 14 outs of 26 games played. Second row from left: José Rey, Enrique Debéllis, Julio Lancieri, Richard Acuña, Carlos Torales, Miguel Santos. Front: Víctor Rodríguez, José Chileli, Daniel Larumbe, Juan Lombardi, Alejandro Garay.
Defensor Sporting – 8th with 27 points. Top row from left: Ruben Silva, Marcelo Tejera, Guillermo Almada, Claudio Arbiza, H. Silva Cantera, Mario Gastán. Crouching: José Chilelli, José González, Héctor Rodríguez, William Gutiérrez, Peter Méndez.
Liverpool – 7th with 29 points.
Danubio – 6th with 29 points.
Racing – 5th with 29 points.
Central Espanol – 4th with 29 points. Second row from left: Pablo Fuentes, Marcelo Paolino, Ruben Dos Santos, Andrés Silva, Fabián Tejera, Marcelo Fracchia. Front: Luis Chabat, Gustavo Ferreira, Gustavo Sarli, Enzo Azambuja, Alfredo Nocetti.
Penarol – 3rd with 31 points.
Nacional – 2nd with 32 points. Standing from left: Mozzo, Peña, Sere, Cardaccio, Milton Gomez, Carlos Favier Soca. First row: Tony Gomez, Julio Cesar Dely Valdez, Moran, W. Gutierrez, Venancio Ramos.
Bella Vista triumphed with the title after very strong season: 16 wins, 7 ties, 3 losses, 34-15 goal-difference and 39 points. They left Nacional 7 points behind! Excellent season and fantastic ending: Bella Vista not only never won a title before, but nobody ever expected them to win a title – they were modest club by all means, nothing in their tradition suggested such success. And with such a margin – beating occasionally Nacional and Penarol was rare achievement to brag about for years, but to leave them in the dust was fantastic. Well deserved victory, no doubt about it, and one more name was added to the short list of clubs having won the Uruguayan title. They also contributed to the great period of the small clubs: for a fourth year now the champion was neither Nacional, nor Penarol, the title going from smallish to smaller clubs, from Defensor Sporting in 1987 to Danubio the next year, to Progreso in 1989 and now to Bella Vista. As for the squad, the new champions were anonymous just like those before them – a nice success of determined team, but also betraying the general weakness of the big clubs: by now practically all good Uruguayan players played football abroad, even Nacional and Penarol had no worthy starts – just look at their squads: the only recognizable name was the import Dely Valdez, himself not from a country known for great football and players. Thus, the underdogs got their chance.
First time and rare one at that more than deserves a second photo: here they are the 1990 champions of Uruguay Bella Vista. Instant legend for the club’s supporters, who knew quite well that a second title would be… impossible.
One more look then at heroic Bella Vista.

Uruguay II Division

Uruguay. Second Division. 10 teams in it, one going down relegated and one up promoted. Small and short championship, which was somewhat enlarged by final tournament between the to 3 teams carrying their regular season points. In theory, that tournament was to cap the season and decided the winner, but it was left unfinished due to… irrelevance. All participants were still from Montevideo -and since the III Division was also from Montevideo – Huracan (barrio Paso de la Arena) – the Uruguayan top leagues were and going to be practically Montevideo championships. So this Huracan (not to be confused with Huracan Buceo) was promoted for 1991.
Fenix finished last with 11 points and was relegated to III Division. Rampla Juniors ended 9th with 13 points. Villa Espanola – 8th with 15 points. Deportivo Italiano – 7th with 15 points. Cerrito – 6th with 16 points.
Miramar Misiones – 5th with 18 points. Standing from left: Romero, Néstor Goñez, Santiago Kalemkerián, Darlyn Gayol, Héctor Cedrés, Juan Tejera. Crouching: Oscar Suárez, Pablo Guidi, Fierro, Varela, Etcheverry.
Colon – 4th with 19 points. Second row from left: ?, Aldo Beninca, Ruben Alzueta, Ruben Baeque, Richard Graña, Alvaro Albacete. Front: E. Vega, Hugo R. Guerra, Marcelo Ferreira, Marcelo Morán, Alberto Correa.
Basanez – 3rd with 23 points. A curious record they had: lost only 1 match, tied 11 out of 18 total, won 6.
Sud America – 2nd with 24 points.
El Tanque Sisley – 1st with 26 points.
The top 3 teams went to play in a mini-tournament between themselves for the top position – theoretically, every team had a chance to be champion, but… the final was left uncompleted. El Tanque Sisley won over Sud America 2-1 and then Sud America canceled the hopes of Basanez beating them 4-1. There was no chance for change of positions, since the points from the regular season were carried on and the last match between El Tanque Sisley and Basanez became irrelevant and not played.
El Tanque Sisley was the II Division champion and promoted to First Division. Excellent achievement for a club rarely playing top league football. Top row from left: Jorge Benítez (K), Heber Bentancur (U), Washington Castelnoble, Pablo Alonso, Gerardo Pilas, Ernesto Ledesma (AC), Richard Cardozo, Ruben De León, Abel Tolosa, Freddy Pintos, Ricardo Ortiz (E).
Middle row: Roberto Castro (PF), Daniel García, Juan Sadukián, Leonardo Peralta, Daniel Hernández, Gaspar Velázquez, Alejandro Acevedo.
Front row: Jorge Palermo, Miguel Peirano, Aldo Azzinari, Eduardo Rinaldi, Néstor Fernández, Daniel Fascioli.

Chile I Division

First Division. Standard league championship with only one unusual element: the semi-finalists and the losing finalist of Copa Chile got 1 extra point added to their records and the winner – 2 points added. The last two teams were relegated, the 13th and the 14th in the final table went to promotion/relegation plaay-off against the second finishers in the Second Division zones. The champion qualified to Copa Libertadores and the second Chilean team was decided in a 4-team tournament between qualified teams placed 2nd to 5th in the final table – although it is not clear why the 5th (Palestino) was out of it and the 6th Deportes Concepcion qualified instead. The championship was dominated by Colo-Colo.
Huachipato ended last with 21 points and went down.
Deportes Iquique – 15th with 24 points and relegated.
Everton – 14th with 24 points. Escaped direct relegation on better goal-difference – by one goal – but still threatened with relegation: going to promotion/relegation play-off.
Naval (Talcahuano) – 13th with 25 points and going to promotion/relegation play-off.
Santiago Wanderers – 12th with 26 points.
Universidad de Chile – 11th with 26 points.
Fernandez Vial – 10th with 27 points.
Cobresal – 9th with 29 points.
Deportes La Serena – 8th with 30 points.
Cobreloa – 7th with 31 points.
Deportes Concepcion – 6th with 33 points.
Palestino – 5th with 33 points.
O’Higgins – 4th with 35 points (1 point added as Copa Chile semi-finalists).
Union Espanola – 3rd with 37 points (1 point added as Copa Chile semi-finalists).
Universidad Catolica – 2nd with 38 points (1 point added as Copa Chile semi-finalists).
Colo-Colo won the championship comfortably with 46 points. 2 points were added to their record because they won Copa Chile as well, but even additional points they had significant lead. 17 wins, 10 ties, only 3 lost games, 60-22 goal-difference. Universidad Catolica scored 4 goals more than the champions, but in defensive matters Colo-Colo had no rival – they allowed only 22 goals in their net (Universidad Catolica permitted 41). Second row from left: Jaime Pizarro, Ruben Espinoza, Javier Margas, Eduardo Vilches, Lizardo Garrido, Jose Daniel Moron. Front row: Marcelo Barticciotto, Ricardo Dabrowski, Ruben Martinez, Sergio Diaz, Raul Ormeño. Not widely known names here, but no doubt very strong by Chilean standards at the time.
By itself, nothing strange Colo-Colo dominated the championship and collected one more title, so perhaps for the moment trivia catches attention more than anything else: Soviet automotive manufacturer Lada sponsored Colo-Colo
and the captain sported the German flag on his armband. Signs of the time. Trivia is trivia, but this squad was going to make itself well known far beyond Chile very soon.

Chile II Division

Chile. First Division championship was simple, Second Division was more complicated. 24 teams played in it, divided into two zones of 12 teams each. After the first standard stage the top 6 teams in each group continued between themselves to contest the title and promotion and the lower 6 teams played in relegation final. Points from the opening stage were carried to the second stage. The winners of each zone were promoted to top flight and second-placed went to promotion-relegation play-offs against the 13th and 14th placed in First Division. In the relegation groups the bottom 2 teams were relegated to Third Division and the team above them went to promotion-relegation play-off against qualified Third Division opponent. Only the final stage of the championship will be given here.
North Zone.
Relegation group:
General Velasquez – last with 20 points and relegated.
San Luis (Quillota) – 5h (11th overall) with 28 points and relegated.
Deportes Arica – 4th (10th) with 28 points and to promotion/relegation play-off.
Deportes Ovalle – 3rd (9th) with 31 points.
Cobreandino – 2nd (8th) with 32 points.
Soinca Bata (Melipilla) – 1st (7th) with 32 points.
Promotion group:
Magallanes – 6th (6th overall) with 27 points.
Union San Felipe – 5th with 30 points.
Regional Atacama – 4th with 37 points.
Audax Italiano – 3rd with 38 points.
Deportes Antofagasta – 2nd with 40 and going to promotion play-offs.

Coquimbo Unido – 1st with 43 points and promoted to First Division. They won both stages of the championship.
South Zone.
Relegation group:
Deportes Valdivia – last with 24 points and relegated.
Curico Unido – 5th (11th overall) with 27 points and relegated.
Deportes Linares – 4th (10th) with 27 points.
Iberia – 3rd (9th) with 30 points.
Deportes Puerto Montt – 2nd (8th) with 30 points.
Deportes Lozapenco – 1st (7th) with 32 points. They had 3 points deducted for financial irregularities.
Promotion group:
Lota Schwager – 6th with 26 points.
Nublense – 5th with 28 points.
Deportes Temuco – 4th with 33 points.
Deportes Colchagua – 3rd with 36 points.
Rangers – 2nd with 41 points and going to promotion play-off.
Provincial Osorno – 1st with 47 points and promoted to First Division. Like the winner of the North Zone, they won both stages of the championship. Provinical Osorno also was declared champion of Second Division – it is unclear whether they played and won a play-off against the champion of the North Zone or simply because they were the team finishing with most points in both zones.

Argentina I Division

First Division. One team dominated the season. As a general observation, long problem and not particular to Argentina was present: low scoring. Independiente scored most goals – 54 in 38 games – which gave them 1.43 goals per game. The champions were worse. Relegation came to play-off, for two teams had the same point-average at the end. So, Racing (Cordoba) and Chaco For Ever met at Boca’s stadium in Buenos Aires to fight for survival – it was not fight at all: Chaco For Ever won 5-0.
Instituto (Cordoba) finished last with 26 points. They were last in the relegation table too and went down to Second Division. Standing form left: Daniel Wermer, Ariel Catinot, César Loza, Sergio Barbieri, Víctor H. Civarelli, Héctor Arzubialde. Front: Walter Fiori, Rivero, Walter Bello, Jorge Matheu, Luna.
Deportivo Espanol – 19th with 31 points. Thanks to earlier record, they had a chance to play in the Copa Libertadores, but lost the qualification tournament. Their strong standing in the relegation table, however, canceled worries about relegation.

Racing (Cordoba) – 18th with 32 points. As mentioned, they had to play a relegation playoff, lost it and went down. Bad year for the city of Cordoba, having two of its 3 top league teams relegated. Second row for m left: Miguel A, Barrios, Lucio Del Mul, Marcelo Quiñones, Eduardo Maldonado, Víctor H. Sotomayor, Juan Bogado (uruguayan). Front: Luis Amuchástegui, Daniel A. Ergo, José A. Barrela, Américo Ozán, Juan Ramón Comas.

Chaco For Ever – 17th with 32 points. Just promoted from Second Division – which was a great success for them – they were in danger of going back to their more familiar league, but managed to stay at least for one more season after destroying Racing (Cordoba) in the relegation playoff.

Estudiantes (La Plata) – 16th with 34 points. Terrible season, really.
San Lorenzo – 15th with 35 points. Standing from left: Riquelme, G.Gonzalez, Bernuncio, Siviski, Docabo, Marchi. Crouching: Carrasco, Villarreal, Ferreyra, Tempone, Calbanese.
Platense – 14th with 36 points.
Union (Santa Fe) – 13th with 36 points.
Newell’s Old Boys – 12th with 36 points. They had 2 points deducted for fans violence. Second row from left: Franco, Martino, Scoponi, Theiler, Fullana, Pochettino. Front: Saldana, Llop, Videla, Falero, Cerino.
Talleres (Cordoba) – 11th with 36 points. Like Newell’s Old Boys, they were penalized with 2-point deduction for violence.
Deportivo Mandiyu – 10th with 36 points. Top row from left: Pedro D. Barrios (uruguayan), Dante Unali, Rubén Cousillas, Pablo Suárez, Elio Rodríguez (uruguayan), César Vega (uruguayan). Crouching: Carlos Tapia, Ricardo Perdomo (uruguayan), Juan C. Verón, Daniel Leani, Félix Torres (paraguayan). Heavily relying on foreign players.
Argentinos Juniors – 9th with 38 points.
Racing (Avellaneda) – 8th with 39 points.


Gimnasia Y Esgrima (La Plata) – 7th with 39 points.
Ferro Carril Oeste – 6th with 39 points.
Velez Sarsfield – 5th with 42 points. Back row from left: Coloccini, Bartero, Simeone, Giuntini, Mancuso, Lucca. Crouching: Funes, Gareca, Morresi, Zarate, Cardozo.
Rosario Central – 4th with 43 points. They had 2 points deducted for violence. Participated in the Copa Libertadores qualification tournament and lost.
Boca Juniors – 3rd with 43 points. Won the Copa Libertadores qualification tournament and thus was the second Argentine representative in the international tournament.
Independiente – 2nd with 46 points. Distant second, no chance for a title this season, but they also lost the Copa Libertadores qualification tournament and that may have been bigger disappointment.
Very strong season for River Plate. They dominated the championship, leaving all others far behind. 20 wins, 13 draws, 5 losses, 48-20 goal-difference, 53 points. They finished 7 points ahead of Independiente and won their 22nd title. May be not an exceptional squad and perhaps lacking strong goalkeeper, but compared to any other team in the league River Plate had the formidable squad and the season left no doubt about it.

Argentina II Division

Argentina. The 1988–89 Argentine Primera División was the 99th season of top-flight football in Argentina. The season ran from 13 August 1989 to 22 May 1990. This tournament was the last played under the double round-robin system. Since the following season, the “Apertura and Clausura format would be introduced, crowning two different champions within a year. The 1989–90 Argentine Primera B Nacional was the fourth season of second division professional of football in Argentina. A total of 22 teams competed. If the championship was simple and clear, promotion and relegation was another matter and quite complicated. In due course it will be introduced.
II Division. The champion was directly promoted to I Division, but the second team to go up was the winner of post-season qualification in which the teams from 2nd to 10th place in the final standing plus the champions of Primera B Metropolitana and Zonales Noroeste and Sureste from Torneo del Interior played. It was cup-format tournament in which the 3rd placed in the championship qualified for the second round and the 2nd placed team – to the ½ final. The winner won promotion to I Division.
Promotion to and relegation from II Division were more complicated. The separate 3-year relegation table existed, of course, but depending on which part of the country the teams in it were, there was direct and indirect relegation – direct for those affiliated with AFA and then went down to Primera B Metropolitana for such clubs were all from Greater Buenos Aires. Those with indirect affiliation with AFA – that is, provincial clubs – went down to their regional leagues. However, the relegation table made distinction between the two groups of teams, so depending on affiliation with AFA the lowest placed from Greater Buenos Aires and the separately the lowest provincial teams went down. However, the provincial teams did not go down just like that – there were 3 promotion/relegation play-offs in which those in danger of relegation played against their regional champion, theoretically a two-leg play-offs, but if the team from II Division, hosting the first leg, won it, there was no second leg. In case two legs were indecisive still, a third leg was played and if there was still no winner, the II Division team kept its place. So, let’s start from that.
Fernandez Oro from Liga Desportiva Confluencia, Rio Negro Province, Zonal Sureste, lost 0-8 to Cipolletti. Standing from left: Gastón González, Claudio Gallucci, Fernando Iglesias, Horacio López, Daniel Villarruel, Alejandro Martini. Crouching: Aníbal Iachetti, Fabio Gallucci, Hugo López, Mirko Ledesma, Nelson.
Cipolletti remained in II Division.
Guemes (Santiago del Estero) from Liga Santiaguena de Futbol managed a 0-0 tie in the first leg against city rivals Central Cordoba, but lost the second leg 1-3.
Central Cordoba (Santiago del Estero) remained in II Division.
Atletico Concepcion from Liga Tucumana de Futbol also was unbetaen in the first leg – 0-0 away against Atletico Tucuman – but no goal was scored in the second leg – 0-0 – and third match was scheduled, in which finaly a goal was scored, but in the net of Atletico Concepcion. Atletico Tucuman won 1-0 and remained in II Division.
Thus, all teams from Second Division playing at promotion/relegation play-offs preserved their places. Only those facing direct relegation went down – that is, teams affiliated with AFA.
Deportivo Armenio was last in the season with 22 points. They were also last in the relegation table and since they were a team from Greater Buenos Aires, were directly relegated to Primera B Metropolitana. The team photo is most likely from the 1990-91 season, but since that is not entirely sure… let stay here.
Olimpo ended 21st with 30 points. They were 21st in the relegation too and subject to indirect relegation to Liga del Sur. However, there is no record of promotion/relegation ply-off, so they must have been directly relegated. Standing from left: Miguel A. Suárez, Antonio Mércuri, Alberto F. Ehulech, Alfredo E. Torres, Horacio Robledo, Daniel Ronco. Front: Alfredo Oviedo, Luis A. Díaz, Marcelo Paolucci, Francisco O. Vargas, Raúl Schmidt.
Cipolletti – 20th with 33 points. 19th in the relegation table and subjected to promotion/relegation play-off which they won and kept their league place.
Defensa y Justicia – 19th with 35 points. 15th in the relegation table and safe.
Talleres (Remedios de Escalada) – 18th with 35 points. 14th in the relegation table and safe. Second row from left: Máximo Pizzarulli, Marcos G. Leiva, Rubén Urquiza, Luis Agli, Daniel Franceschini, Walter Cuadra. Crouching: Claudio Chiodi, Omar González, Omar Castro Villasenín, Alfredo O. Videla, Aldo Noblea.
Deportivo Maipu – 17th with 35 points. 18th in the relegation table and safe.
Central Cordoba (Santiago del Estero) – 16th with 37 points. They had 2 points deducted for violence acts. 16th in the relegation table and subjected to promotion/relegation play-off, which they won and kept their place.

Los Andes – 15th with 38 points, but they were 20th in the relegation table and were directly relegated to Primera B Metropolitana. Tough luck.
Almirante Brown – 14th with 39 points. 12th in the relegation table and thus perhaps safe even after the next season, for there were others bellow them from Greater Buenos Aires.
Tigre – 13th with 41 points. 17th in the relegation table, but that was worry for the next season.
Atletico Tucuman – 12th with 43 points. 10th in the relegation table, but since geography played a role… they were the lowest from their own geographical region and went to promotion/relegation playoff – luckily, they won it and remained in the league. Standing from left: Colalillo, Suárez, Morales, Doroni, Salomón, Cáceres. First row: José L. Acosta, Lugo, Scime, Pacheco, Walter O. Jiménez.
With them end all relegated and almost relegated teams, so there is no need to give more relegation-table places.
Villa Dalmine – 11th with 44 points.
Colon – 10th with 45 points and qualified for Promotion Playoff.
Sportivo Italiano – or Deportivo Italiano – 9th with 46 points and qualified for Promotion Playoff.
Banfield – 8th with 46 points and qualified for Promotion Playoff. Standing from left: Jorge L. Ávalos, Luis A. Oriolo, Daniel Bolognese, Juan C. Doná, Andrés Lizarraga, Néstor Lo Tártaro. Front: Horacio García, Fabián Berruti, Daniel Delfino, Marcelo Martino, Marcelo Benítez.
Belgrano – 7th with 47 points and qualified to Promotion Playoff.
Atletico Rafaela – 6th with 47 points and qualified for Promotion Playoff. Second row from left: Esteban Bernasconi, Otero, Dante Fontana, Hugo Querini, Ramón Jaquet, Oscar Manis, Gustavo Alfaro. First row: Pablo Quiroga, Julián Pascual Alastuey, Juán Poelman, Víctor Grillo.
Lanus – 5th with 47 points and qualified for Promotion Playoff.
San Martin (Tucuman) – 4th with 48 points and qualified for Promotion Playoff.
Douglas Haig – 3rd with 51 points and qualified for Promotion Playoff.
Quilmes – 2nd with 53 points and qualified for Promotion Playoff. Standing from left: Carlos Karabin, Hugo Ayala, Héctor Almandoz, Alberto Rodriguez, Emilio Kalujerovich, Carlos Castagneto. Front: Abel Blason, Jorge Gáspari, Omar Gomez, Luis Ernesto Sosa, Marcelo Rufini.
Huracan won the championship with 60 points. 24 wins, 12 ties, 6 losses, 70-32 goal-difference. Confident winners and promoted back to top flight, where they more or less rightly belonged. Standing from left: Cúper, Wiktor, Puentedura, Brítez, Montero, Amodeo. First row: Wolheim, Mohamed, Herrero, Carrió, Saturno.
Promotion Playoff. 9 teams qualified from Second Division plus 3 teams from the lower level: Deportivo Moron, Deportivo Laferrere and Atlanta. 10 teams started in the first stage.
Deportivo Laferrere was eliminated by Lanus 1-2 and 1-1.
Deportivo Moron was eliminated by Atletico Rafaela 0-1 and 2-1. Why they were eliminated is a mystery – both opponents won their away leg and since Deportivo Moron scored 2 away goals, they should have been going up. If away goal rule was not applied, then a third match should have been played. But no and they were out.
Colon lost to Belgrano 2-1 and 0-2.
Banfield lost to Sportivo Italiano 0-3 and 2-1.
Atlanta lost to San Martin 2-3 and 0-4.
Second round – now Douglas Haig entered. And lost to Sportivo Italiano 2-2 and 0-3 (at home).
Belgrano eliminated San Martin 1-0 and 0-0, and Lanus destroyed Atletico Rafaela 3-0 and 5-2.
Semifinals – Quilmes entered and eliminated Sportivo Italiano 1-1 and 2-0. Lanus eliminated Belgrano by the rules: in case of no winner, the higher-placed team in the championship final table went ahead – the results were 0-1 and 2-1, so Belgrano was out.
Final: still two legs and away goals did not count. In case of a tie, penalty shootout followed. And that was the case at the end: Lanus won 2-1 at home, but lost 0-1 in Quilmes. However, the hosts were shamed in front of their own crowd – Lanus won the penalty shootout 4-1.
Thus Lanus earned promotion to First Division, a great success for them. Was it fair is an academic question… they were only 5th at the end of the regular championship. Yet, they benefited by the rules and rules are rules, so promotion was great at the end. Standing from left: Cordero, Meske, Alcides Herrera, Schurrer, Armando González. First row: Bertolini, Bidevich, Néstor González, Guillermo Alonso, Angelello, Villagrán.
Yet, it would be unfair to end with Lanus – after all, they were only the second promoted team and not champions.
Huracan (Buenos Aires) was the Second Division champion and even if they were a far cry from the great team led by Luis Cesar Menotti more than 15 years ago, they were winners and climbing up – returning to First Division was all the old and respected club craved at the moment and they triumphed.

Brazil I Division

I Division. Format: The tournament was played in a double round-robin system. For the determination of the quarterfinalists the 20 Teams were divided into 2 groups. The best team of each group considering only results within the group and the best team of each group considering only results with teams from the other group alongside the 4 best placed teams in the overall table advance to the quarterfinals. The bottom two teams were relegated.
First stage
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1
Grêmio
19
9
7
3
25
13
+12
25
Advances to the Quarterfinals
2
Atlético Mineiro
19
7
9
3
19
16
+3
23

3
São Paulo
19
8
6
5
20
14
+6
22
Advances to the Quarterfinals
4
Corinthians
19
8
6
5
17
18
−1
22

5
Bahia
19
7
8
4
20
12
+8
22

6
Bragantino
19
7
8
4
19
16
+3
22

7
Santos
19
7
8
4
19
13
+6
22
Advances to the Quarterfinals
8
Palmeiras
19
8
5
6
21
18
+3
21

9
Cruzeiro
19
8
5
6
21
18
+3
21

10
Goiás
19
7
7
5
22
19
+3
21

11
Flamengo
19
7
6
6
24
18
+6
20

12
Botafogo
19
7
4
8
17
18
−1
18

13
Náutico
19
4
10
5
13
18
−5
18

14
Vasco da Gama
19
3
12
4
15
15
0
18

15
Fluminense
19
5
5
9
19
24
−5
15

16
Internacional
19
4
7
8
19
23
−4
15

17
Vitória
19
4
7
8
15
22
−7
15

18
Portuguesa
19
3
9
7
18
22
−4
15

19
São José
19
3
9
7
10
20
−10
15
Relegation to 1991 Campeonato Brasileiro Série B
20
Inter de Limeira
19
4
2
13
9
25
−16
10

Cruzeiro – 9th. Standing from left: Paulo César, Gilson Jader, Adilson, Balu, Roberson, Eduardo Souza. First row: Heider, Paulo Isidoro, Luiz Gustavo, Careca, Édson.
Goias – 10th.
Flamengo – 11th.
Botafogo – 12th.
Nautico – 13th.
Vasco da Gama – 14th.
Fluminense – 15th.
Inter (Porto Alegre) – 16th. Standing from left: Cézar Zabala, Elisha Erhart, Maicena, Norberto Arruda Lemos, Chiquinho Junior, Daniel Franco. Crouching: Bernardo Silva, Marcelo Gonçalves Prates, Guga Goleta Pavarotti, Nélson Bali, Edu Lima XI.
Vitoria – 17th.
Portuguesa – 18th. May be a photo of the period, if not of the actual season. Standing from left: Paulo César, Gilmar, Edinho, Jorginho, Capitão, Norberto. Front: Zé Roberto, Caio, Paulinho Mc Laren, Zinho, Nílson.
Sao Jose – 19th and relegated. Really unfortunate – they ended in the relegation on goal-difference .
Inter (Limeria) – last and out. They were the weakest team this season and deserved relegation.
¼ finals:
Atletico Mineiro was eliminated by Corinthians 1-2 and 0-0.
Santos lost to Sao Paulo 0-1 and 1-1.
Palmeiras lost to Gremio 1-0 and 0-2.
Bragantino lost to Bahia 1-1 and 2-3. Standing from left: Luis Carlos Prima (Prep. Físico), Gil Baiano, Biro-Biro, Carlos Augusto, Mauro Silva, Marcelo. Crouching: Ivair, Tiba, Mário, Mazinho, João Santos.
½ finals:
Gremio lost to Sao Paulo 0-2 and 1-0. Standing from left: Mazaropi, Vilson, Alfinete. Luis Cláudio, Jandir, Hélcio. First row: Caio, Cuca, Nilson, Paulo Egidio, Assis.
Bahia eliminated by Corinthians 1-2 and 0-0.
Final: tough clash between Corinthians and Sao Paulo in which Corinthians prevailed twice by 1-0.
Sad ending of the season, but they lost both final legs. As a squad, a bit short on big names and perhaps that was the reason they lost.
Marvelous season for Corinthians – Brazilian champions at last and the victory was square and fair – they won both legs of the final. Long wait, lost first attempt in 1976, but this time they were on top. Compared to other teams – and not just Sao Paulo, but perhaps 4-5 other clubs – Corinthians had no big stars and that made the victory even better. They were unable to win with Socrates – which is sad – but without him they won the title.
First time champions – a historic moment. And what delight for club, players and mostly the fans longing for big triumph so many years. At last one of the most popular and respected Brazilian clubs put its name in the list of champions and beating their bitter city rivals Sao Paulo was just wonderful.

Brazil II Division

II Division – Serie B. Format:
First Phase: The 24 participants were divided into four groups of six teams each. The teams competed in round within groups and robin, qualifying to the next stage the top four of each shift. The four teams with the worst campaigns would be relegated to 1991 Série C, but no such tournament happened, as CBF decided to include 64 clubs in the 1991 Série B, and cancel the Série C of that year.
Second Phase: The 16 qualified teams were divided into four groups with four teams each, playing in the group in turn and robin, qualifying the top two from each group to the next stage.
Third Phase: The 8 qualified teams were divided into two groups of four teams each, playing in the group in turn and robin, qualifying the best of each group for the final.
Final: Both teams champions group of stage disputed the title in two matches. Both gained access to the 1991 Campeonato Brasileiro Série A.
Group A[edit]
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1
Criciúma
10
5
3
2
8
6
+2
13
Qualified to the second phase
2
Blumenau
10
3
5
2
5
3
+2
11

3
Atlético-PR
10
2
7
1
7
2
+5
11

4
Juventude
10
3
4
3
6
7
−1
10

5
Joinville
10
2
5
3
8
8
0
9
Eliminated
6
Coritiba
10
2
2
6
6
14
−8
6
Relegated to 1991 Série C
Coritiba going down. It was not long ago they were champions of Brazil… and now relegated to third level. But the rules were changed meantime and Cortitba stayed in Seria B. Fair? No, but Brazilian football politics are special case.
Group B
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1
Grêmio Maringá
10
4
4
2
9
6
+3
12
Qualified to the second phase
2
XV de Piracicaba
10
4
4
2
13
12
+1
12

3
Botafogo-SP
10
4
3
3
14
6
+8
11

4
Guarani
10
4
2
4
13
11
+2
10

5
Rio Branco-AC
10
2
4
4
7
15
−8
8
Eliminated
6
Anapolina
10
1
5
4
9
15
−6
7
Relegated to 1991 Série C
End of season for Rio Branco.
Group C
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1
Catuense
10
5
4
1
14
6
+8
14
Qualified to the second phase
2
Operário-PR
10
4
4
2
16
8
+8
12

3
Juventus
10
5
1
4
8
10
−2
11

4
Itaperuna
10
3
4
3
10
11
−1
10

5
Central
10
1
5
4
4
8
−4
7
Eliminated
6
Americano
10
2
2
6
4
13
−9
6
Relegated to 1991 Série C
Initially America was going down, then rules changed in their favour.
Group D
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1
Sport
10
3
6
1
9
4
+5
12
Qualified to the second phase
2
Moto Club
10
3
6
1
8
4
+4
12

3
Remo
10
3
5
2
9
6
+3
11

4
Ceará
10
4
2
4
8
9
−1
10

5
Santa Cruz
10
2
6
2
8
9
−1
10
Eliminated
6
Treze
10
1
3
6
4
14
−10
5
Relegated to 1991 Série C
Short season for Santa Cruz.
Second phase
Group E
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification
1
Guarani
6
3
2
1
6
3
+3
8
Advanced to the Third phase
2
Criciúma
6
2
2
2
5
4
+1
6

3
XV de Piracicaba
6
2
1
3
5
8
−3
5

4
Blumenau
6
1
3
2
5
6
−1
5

Group F
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification
1
Juventude
6
4
2
0
6
1
+5
10
Advanced to the Third phase
2
Atlético Paranaense
6
3
1
2
7
4
+3
7

3
Botafogo-SP
6
2
2
2
4
3
+1
6

4
Grêmio Maringá
6
0
1
5
3
12
−9
1

Botafogo (Ribeirao Preto) and Socrates finished at this stage.
Gremio (Maringa) – last in the group.
Group G
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification
1
Catuense
6
3
1
2
6
5
+1
7
Advanced to the Third phase
2
Moto Club
6
3
0
3
4
3
+1
6

3
Juventus
6
3
0
3
5
5
0
6

4
Ceará
6
2
1
3
3
5
−2
5

Ceara – last.
Group H
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification
1
Operário-PR
6
3
2
1
6
5
+1
8
Advanced to the Third phase
2
Sport
6
1
4
1
4
4
0
6

3
Itaperuna
6
1
4
1
4
4
0
6

4
Remo
6
1
2
3
5
6
−1
4

Unlucky Itaperuna.
Remo – last in the group.
Third phase
Group I
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification
1
Sport
6
3
3
0
8
5
+3
9
Advanced to the final
2
Guarani
6
3
2
1
10
3
+7
8

3
Juventude
6
2
2
2
6
7
−1
6

4
Moto Club
6
0
1
5
5
14
−9
1

Guarani knew better days. Now the attempt to return to first level football failed.
Group J
Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification
1
Atlético Paranaense
6
2
3
1
7
5
+2
7
Advanced to the final
2
Criciúma
6
2
2
2
10
5
+5
6

3
Operário-PR
6
2
2
2
5
9
−4
6

4
Catuense
6
2
1
3
7
10
−3
5

Catuense tried hard, but their failure was more or less expected.
Operario.

With that, Atletico Paranaense and Sport were both promoted to Serie A, which was the main goal of the championship, but there was still a final to be played for the title of Serie B. The first leg was played on December 12, 1990 and ended 1-1. The second leg, in Recife, played on December 16, also ended in tie: 0-0. Sport was declared champion of Serie B due to better season record. Again, was it fair is more than questionable, but no big deal in reality.
Atletico Paranaense – unbeaten at the final, but losers… kind of losers, for they were promoted to Serie A, so the season was more than satisfying.
Sport (Recife) – champions of Serie B. Questionable champions, for they were unable to prevail over Atletico Paranaense, but rules are rules. Yes, the rules were a bit strange, but even if the widely employed away-goal rule was in force, they would have been champions, so… only third match or penalty shoot-out could could have produced different winner. All that is purely academic, though – promotion was the most important aim and it was already achieved before the final. A trophy was not hurting, though.

Brazil III Division

Brazil. A brief look at some teams not present in the top 2 leagues this season:
Auto Esporte
Londrina
ABC
Figueirense
Gama
Goiania
Mogi Mirim
Novorizontino

Rio Negro

Confianca
Taguatinga
Volta Redonda
Most – if not all – of those clubs played in Serie C in 1990 and perhaps unsatisfied with the low level put pressure for enlargement of Serie B. But there was 1990 Serie C championship and it was won by
Campinense. A title is a title, going along with promotion up. Effectively, Campinense played by the existent rules and fairly promoted, so may be they were not all that happy to see the second level enlarged and teams which they left behind going up along with them.

Copa Libertadores

Copa Libertadores. The formula: every country participated with 2 teams and in the first phase they were divided in 5 groups of 4 teams. So far, it was like always. But this time 3 teams of each group qualified to the 1/8 finals and the reigning Cup holder joined at this stage making 16 teams. From then on direct elimination to the final. But the tragic event in Colombia leading to cancellation of its 1989 championship – the murder of a referee – and the obvious involvement of drug lords in Colombian football, escalating to threats of international games referees led the CONMEBOL to sanctioning the Colombian clubs: they were banned from home games and had to play them in another country. Logistic problems – real or conveniently invented – led the Colombian participants to withdrawal from the tournament, except Atletico Nacional (Medellin), the reigning Copa Libertadores holder and belonging to the notorious Pablo Escobar. Atletico Medellin participated in the tournament, playing home games in… well, in Medellin at the 1/8 finals, but in Santiago (Chile) after that. However, the withdrawal of the other Colombian clubs left Group 3 with 2 teams (Argentinian Independiente and River Plate, which played as required, but for nothing for both teams qualified to the 1/8 automatically in fact) and 15 teams entering the second phase. Thus, one team was lucky to have a bye in the 1/8 finals.
The group phase was a Brazilian disaster – Vasco da Gama ended 3rd in Group 5 and Gremio – 4th. Uruguayan Progreso and Defensor Sporting finished with 7 points each in Group 4 and goal-difference placed Progreso at the first place, but Group 1 provided extra entertainment: all teams ended with 6 points. Goal-difference could not determine their final positions either, so 1st and 2nd place were determined by most goals scored – thus, Emelec (Ecuador) ended ahead The Strongest (Bolivia) – but the other two teams had exactly the same goal-difference – 6-7 – and play-off was staged between Bolivian Oriente Petrolero and Ecuadorian Barcelona – Barcelona won and took 3rd place. Lucky beginning, but the rest of their campaign was splendid. Surprisingly, they reached the final after eliminating mighty River Plate in penalty shootout in the ½ finals (regular games ended 1-0 and 0-1). At that stage Olimpia (Paraguay) took revenge for their loss at the 1989 to Atletico Nacional – they won in Santiago 2-1, but lost 2-3 at home managed to prevail 2-1 in the penalty shoot-out. Not only the Paraguayans were happy – the elimination of Atletico Nacional canceled the big chance of second consecutive victory of Pablo Escobar and drug money in the very year when CONMEBOL tried – lamely, as it was – to cut of them. So, the big final was Olimpia – Barcelona.

Olimpia hosted the first leg and won it 2-0.

Barcelona tried as much as they could in Guayaquil, but Marcelo Trobbiani’s goal was not enough. Tem minutes before he scored the veteran Paraguayan goalkeeper saved a penalty and in the 80th minute the Paraguayans equalized.
Olimpia won.

Naturally, the joy was endless.
Mixed feelings in Barcelona (Guayaquil) camp – of course, coming to the final only to lose it was no fun. But it was not a tragedy either – not only it was the first time for the club to reach Copa Libertadores final, but it was the biggest success of Ecuadorian football so far. It was grand achievement for club, city and country, something making everybody proud and thus grieve of the loss was replaced with much more positive attitude.

The success was largely due to the excellent coaching of former Argentine star Miguel Angel Brindisi, who took the reigns in 1989, bringing with himself old, but worthy reinforcements – his coutryman midfielder Marcelo Trobbiani (35 old, coming from Chilean Cobreloa) and the 31 years old Uruguayan striker Luis Acosta (from Ecuadorian Filabanco) in 1989 and in 1990 – one more famed Uruguayan: the 31-years old midfielder Mario Saralegui (from Penarol). May be over the hill for bigger clubs, but the vastly experienced trio was instrumental for Barcelona’s success – although no longer called to their national teams, the veterans brought class and inspiration to Barcelona, also helping Brindisi to emply his tactical schemes and demands.

Compared to their rivals, Olimpia (Asuncion) was very different – they were not newcomers on thebig scene at all – it was their 4th Copa Libertadores final and second in a row. Once they won the Cup already – in 1979. Now, 10 years later they secured a second victory. And well deserved it was, for Olimpia was playing fine for quite some time.

The success was largely due to the good work of two club Presidents – during the reign of Osvaldo Dominguez Dibb Olimpia won its first Copa Libertadores Cup and his successor Oscar Carrismo Neto continued in the same direction, successfully building a new team. Given Paraguayan resources, it was not an easy task and for that – a great, even rare, achievement. There was good base, transition was made carefully and level-headed, depending on home-grown talent and healthy atmosphere. Unlike Barcelona – and most South American clubs, indeed – Olimpia had only Paraguayan players in the squad.
A link with the great success of 1979 was maintained by hiring again the mastermind of the former triumph Luis Cubilla – the Uruguayan, now 50 years old, arrived for his second spell with Olimpia in 1988 and quickly repeated his first solid work. The team, according to the testimonies of the players, was wonderful collective of players who played together for a long time, they grew together as a team, matured and succeeded. Olimpia was well-oiled team, playing attacking football – that comes from everybody of the team asked for recollections, but memory is funny thing: in later years, players said the team was young and that contradicts birthdates: a good number of key players was approaching 30 in 1990 and there were still playing links with the 1979 triumphal squad – Jorge Guasch, for example. The goalkeeper Ever Hugo Almeida must be mentioned, of course: 42-years by now and living legend not only of the club, the naturalized Uruguayan was a great example and motivator for his teammates in both Olimpia and the Paraguayan national team. He was more than solid between the goalposts – particularly instrumental by saving penalties in both regular time and penalty shoot-outs, including the second leg of the final. Almeida retired shortly after the Copa Libertadores victory, but retired as a winner. Players like him and Guasch made the work Cubilla easier, for they were familiar with his style from previous work under him and quickly translated his demands in the dressing room. As a whole, Olimpia made a great transition from one team to another and rightfully came on top of South American football.